Disney Resort Fun Facts

  • Disney’s only full-time harpist entertains diners at Victoria & Albert’s, a grand dining experience at Disney’s Grand Floridian Resort & Spa.
  • It would take more than 20 million 12-ounce cans of Coca-Cola to fill one of the humongous Coke cups at Home Run Hotel in Disney’s All-Star Sports Resort
  • It would take nearly 9.5 million tennis balls to fill one of the tennis ball cans at Center Court Hotel in Disney’s All-Star Sports Resort. That’s enough to stretch from Walt Disney World Resort to Key West
  • Stormalong Bay, Disney’s Beach Club Resort swimming area, holds 750,000 gallons of water, making it the largest sand-bottom pool in the world.
  • The mosaic mural in the fourth-floor lobby of Disney’s Contemporary Resort was created in 1971 with 1,800 one-square-foot tiles and took 18 months to construct. Look closely: there’s a five-legged goat facing the monorail track
  • The musical notes across the registration desk at Disney’s Port Orleans Resort-French Quarter play out the first verse of “When the Saints Go Marching In.”
  • The giant Big Wheel in the 1970s courtyard of Disney’s Pop Century Resort can “accommodate” a child rider who weighs up to 877 pounds (according to the “recommended child weight” sticker affixed to the gigantic toy).
  • If you wanted to stay in all the guestrooms in all of the hotels and resorts currently open on Walt Disney World property (at a rate of one per night), it would take more than 68 years.
  • Nearly 12 percent of Walt Disney World property – an area equivalent to nearly 3,000 football fields – is devoted to gardens and maintained landscapes. That’s 4,000 acres worth of beauty.
  • Disney's Polynesian Resort has a unique "Kukui Nut" tree. The only one of its kind in the state of Florida, the tree was brought to Walt Disney World Resort from its native Hawaii.
  • With 2,880 Guest rooms, Disney's Pop Century Resort is one of the largest hotels in the United States
  • The lobby of the Wilderness Lodge contains 2 massive 55-foot tall hand-carved totem poles. Stacked end-to-end, they'd be as tall as the Earffel Tower at Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park! The totems' animal figures depict various Native American myths and legends—one is dedicated to the raven, the other is topped by an eagle.
  • The gallery located near the entrance to Victoria & Albert's at Disney's Grand Floridian Resort & Spa features 11 original maps of Florida dated from 1775 up to the period of railroad tycoon Henry M. Flagler's railway lines.
  • The 16-foot Ijele mask on display in the lobby of Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge is the first of its kind ever to leave Nigeria.
  • The 90-foot, floor-to-ceiling ceramic mural at Disney's Contemporary Resort was designed by Walt Disney Imagineer Mary Blair, who was also responsible for the distinct look and feel of the "it's a small world" attraction at Magic Kingdom theme park
  • In The Caribbean Beach Resort, The Old Port Royale pool is themed after a Spanish fortress. Port Royale is also the setting for both the movie and the Magic Kingdom theme park attraction "Pirates of the Caribbean."
  • Disney's Coronado Springs Resort was named for Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, a 16th-century Spanish explorer. In 1540, he set sail for the New World in search of the Seven Cities of Cibola and their fabled riches of gold. He never found the legendary riches, but members of his group became the first Europeans to reach the Grand Canyon.
  • The miniature carousel located in the lobby of Disney's BoardWalk Inn was hand-crafted in the 1920s at Coney Island by M.C. Illions, a master designer and manufacturer of merry-go-rounds.
  • There are 160 records along the balconies at Rock Inn at the All Star Music Resort
  • The Pongo icon at the All Star Movies Resort located at the One Hundred and One Dalmatians building stands 30 feet tall and weighs 17,000 pounds. It took 2 days to put it together.
  • The tennis ball can icons at the All Star Sports Resort at Center Court can hold approximately 9,474,609 regulation size tennis balls.